Mysterious missing “region” argument in Terraform

I’m working on my next course for Pluralsight, Implementing Terraform on AWS. I probably don’t need to explain what the course is about. Anyhow, I was trying to show how you can create multiple instances of an AWS provider using the alias argument. Running through the initialization and validation process I ran into an error that was not very helpful.

Error: Missing required argument

The argument "region" is required, but was not set.

No mention of what line the error occurred on, or what resource in the configuration was throwing it. Just a missing region argument. Let’s see what’s going on here.

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The Terraform Certified Study Guide

As I mentioned in a previous post, HashiCorp has officially announced the availability of two certifications, Terraform Certified Associate and Vault Certified Associate. In that post I detailed a bunch of different resources to help you study for the Terraform exam. One of those resources was a study guide that Adin Ermie and I put together called the HashiCorp Terraform Certified Associate Preparation Guide, which does not lend itself well to an acronym – HTCAPG? I guess we could go with Hat Cap? Nah. Anyway, I thought I would give you an idea of what is in the guide, and a free sample of a few pages.

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Preparing for the HashiCorp Terraform Certification

HashiCorp has recently announced the availability of the Terraform Certified Associate exam. This is an excellent way to assess your skills and demonstrate your competence with the Infrastructure as Code tool, Terraform. Those who have been following me for any period of time know that I am a pretty big fan of Terraform, and may have authored more than a few posts and courses on the topic. What you might not know is that I was actively involved in writing and reviewing the questions for the exam. In this post, I will give you an overview of what to expect in the exam, how I think you should study for it, and some materials to help you along the way.

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Cloud Field Day 6 Prep – Morpheus Data and HashiCorp

This is part of a series of posts I’m writing as I prepare to attend Cloud Field Day 6. There are a total of eight presenters planned for CFD6, and I am going to cover two vendors per post. My goal is to have a basic understanding of each vendor’s product portfolio with a focus on cloud related products. Some of these vendors I am already familiar with, and others are new to me. In this post I am going to take a look at Morpheus Data and HashiCorp.

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Goals for 2019

I don’t believe in making New Year’s Resolutions. Or at least, I don’t believe in making the type of New Year’s Resolutions that you might typically think of. A grandiose resolution to achieve an overly ambitious goal in an unrealistic time-frame. Whether it’s resolving to start working out five days a week when you don’t work out at all, or losing 100 lbs. and keeping it off, or finally reading War & Peace. Those are all laudable goals, but setting your sights too high tends to end in failure. As in all things, moderation is key. I think it’s important to have a high-level goal, along with smaller milestones, and achievable tasks.

Let’s take running a marathon as an example. The high-level goal is to run a marathon. But if you just leave your house and try to run without any kind of plan or milestones, you’re probably going to stick with that plan for about a week. You have to set milestones, like being able to run a 5k in one month, a 10k in three months, a half-marathon in six months, etc. Then break those milestones into smaller goals, like run three times a week for the first month. Each of the activities, each run per se, is a task that has a purpose. In week 1 you might set a goal of running for 30 minutes each day, regardless of distance or speed. Breaking a monumental goal, like running a marathon, into something simple – running for 30 minutes – makes the entire process feel realistic. And each time you achieve your tiny goal, you get a sense of accomplishment. And if you track those accomplishments over the course of the high-level goal, you’ll be able to see real progress. Seeing that progress is a true motivator! How do I know? In 2012 I ran my first marathon, and this is exactly how I did it.

All of this is a VERY long-winded way of saying that I don’t believe in typical New Year’s Resolutions. I believe in setting goals, no matter what time of year it is, and creating a realistic plan to achieve those goals. That being said, the end of the year is an especially good time to reflect on what you accomplished in the previous year, and what goals you have in-flight for the next year. Having a well-defined moment in time to pursue internal reflection is necessary to staying on track or updating your plans to accommodate changes to your situation, and I don’t see any reason not to use the changing of the calendar year as such. The following items are goals that I have for 2019. Most of these goals are based on something that is already in-flight – remember, I don’t wait until January 1 to start a new project. I am going to try to provide some actionable tasks for each goal as well as metrics for success. Away we go!

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